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place to be once they settle this thing. the third and the most important thing is the u.s. economy is the most vibrant, adaptable, innovative and creative economy on the planet. i think that means we're coming out and starting to see that in many sectors today. we're bullish and think you need to look at this on a positive frame. >> maria, i'm less bullish than that. that sounds very optimistic. i would love to believe that, but if you compare valuations of equities versus bonds, yes, there's a huge spread right now, but that doesn't necessarily make equities really cheap. it's just a relative trade. i think, also, yes, we're a vibrant economy. we certainly are a strong economy. i think it's really unsustainable, the level of debt that we have in this country. we have $1 trillion in debt. i heard an incredibly succinct way of describing this. rick santelli actually said it this morning about how you can't say you're cutting $800 billion when really $80 billion is really from wars that are just going away. that's not really a cut. that's taking away the addition. i think you need to
. are unemployment checks going to stimulus the economy. house minority leader nancy peel pole said yes. >> it is more injected by unemployment insurance. >> okay, to get this number down, get the number of people on these lines that you are looking at up. how is that going to work. i am cheryl casone and welcome to cashin in . joining us is trace yejohn and christian dorsey . welcome to all of you. tracey, benefits the best form of stimulus, really, you agree with that? >> the only thing that jobless stimulus benefit is apathy it is it easier to stay at home and collect a check than work at mcdonalds. we are so lazy these days, take 99 weeks was a freebey. we saw it with the hostess union guys. we rather take unemployment than take consessions. >> wayne, the benefits are so crucial we should extend them and not keep them in place but give more of a hand out to the unemployment for the reasons of saving the economy. >> i have a better idea. have everybody stand on the corner with a bag of cash. it is idiotic and nancy pelosi, she is a -- econist. that is it a guy who drives the car by l
the economy avoid the cliff and rides above? anyway, senior u.s. economist and managing director at ubs. do you think we'll get a deal? >> i think we'll get a deal. do we get it before the holidays or after for markets, it matters. it's been a drag for the last nine months. so the idea that there is more uncertainty now than there was six months ago, how does that work? there was no fiscal cliff deal six months from now and still no deal. so i'm not sure why we think there's more uncertainty. i would say if you really think about it the president has a lot of ways to delay the impact. for example, our withholding table don't have to get change order january 1. even if you haven't struck a deal, you don't adjust the withholding tables. for now you can delay the pain. so there is wiggle room in terms of when the impact has to be felt. >> but is there where wiggle rom the investing world who looks at the united states and says these guys are a bunch of keystone cops. this cost us with the last round of negotiations back in the summer of 2011 when the debt rating agencies said if you can't find
of the year. we have so much uncertainty in washington. we do have slowing economies in europe and in the u.s. >> right. david, what do you say right now? break the tie for us. >> break the tie. in the near term, there's an epic tug of war between extremely aggressive monetary easing and just total disdain for what they're doing in washington on tax and regulatory policy. in the near term, the fiscal cliff prevails. in the longer term, the fed will prevail. there's so much mistrust on stocks that i think that still can be a positive catalyst for stocks relative to traditional bonds over the next 12 months. >> i'm going to push back a little bit on that. >> i'm going to break the tie in ralph's favor. >> david, i want to push back a little bit on that. in terms of -- like, is the fed really that much of a factor these days now in terms of keeping the market afloat? >> absolutely. >> it's not losing its bang for its buck? >> it's not as powerful as it was in the fall of 2008 or even 2010, but when you consider that, u.s., long bonds, 1.5%. short-term interest rates, zero. negative on an infla
think the ramifications for the economy are too significant. i think we're watching whatever you want to call it, all of the politics playing out, but i still think in the end we'll get a last minute deal. >> i agree. and i think even though the sides are far apart, you have things on the table now. so you can say you're here at 800, 1.6, you kind of -- it gets you somewhere close. somebody will try to say 1.3 versus 1.1, but if you see publicly what they're stating and hopefully privately other things are going on, but it will get done, but it will be very slow. >> john boehner with the proposal he put on the table, i did see commentary from some of the far right saying this is not an acceptable proposal. even his proposal is not acceptable. i did see comment it ter that came through. my question is does the president now have to alienate some of his far left base in order to reach a compromise. >> i think you'll see both of them have to actually bring the parties together. because you won't get everybody happy. some of the people who got voted on the ticket side, no, never. but it w
minutes away. count do countdown is on. the economy probably added about 80,000 jobs last month. reuters consensus is a little higher at 93,000. the unemployment rate expected to hold steady at 7.9% and economists say the slow down in nonfarm payrolls will reflect the effect of sandy. joining us this hour is bank of america merrill lynch global research senior research economist michelle mire and we'll talk through everything that's been happening through jobs and what to expect. but first, there is a developing story. an earthquake off the northeast coast of japan triggered a tsunami warning. the warning has been lifted, but it was a 7.3 quake. so far no reports of any injuries or damage. it was for the same area devastated by an earthquake and tsunami back in march of last year. we will continue to bring you any developments. in the meantime, steve has some of the morning's top other stories. >> let's start with the markets. asian stocks rallying to 2012 highs overnight. the nikkei edging lower after hitting a se hitting hitting a seven month closing high yesterday. european trading, s
to get better. the economy is strong. it's going to get stronger. >> what evidence do you have these guys are not just going to go over the fiscal cliff? we heard tim geithner on this program yesterday when steve asked him, look f you don't get what you want, do we go over the fiscal cliff? he said absolutely. >> he said he would do it! >> what happens when we wake up january nd, we go over the cliff, and the world doesn't end? >> that is so irresponsible. >> you have to be a long-term investor. long-term stocks have outperformed bonds. >> with all do respect, george, are you one of those come play september investors larry is referring to? >> i'd say we're opposite of that. we never take anything for granted, but we bet accordingac. bonds are trouble. a lot of people are going to lose a lot of money in bonds. you have to be prepared for that. interest rates are going to go up. dividends are going to continue to increase. the economy in this country is strong. it's going to get stronger. >> even at 44% dividend tax? >> it's not going to go that high. >> if we go over the fiscal cliff, it
. instead, reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow-walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. >> reporter: not surprisingly, democratic house leader nancy pelosi had precisely the opposite explanation for what is behind this stalemate. she says republicans simply echoing the white house are going to have to buckle on the issue of the top rates. >> the only obstacle standing in the way of middle income tax relief are the republicans unwillingness to ask the top 2% to pay their fair share. >> but tyler, as you suggested, this is all a work in progress. the thing we cannot see that is not visible to the public or to the press is what's going on behind the scenes. staff discussions resumed yesterday. don't know how fruitful. i haven't gotten much of a signal from people on either side that a deal is close, but they're work rg at it and sometimes these situations can turn around quickly. >> john, what of the reports today that perhaps at some point the republicans in the house and in the senate would go along with the idea of extending the bus
just during recessions. i do think that the economy can do better. i think we know that companies, i do still believe, our sideline, they are hesitant based on the uncertainty associated with washington and the economy. they have actually probably fallen a bit behind on the hiring they need to do. i do think we can do better than this. melissa: if we cut that this rate, it would take us nine years. is there anything we could be doing better? >> i know everybody says this, but i do think it is true. it is more certainty. if we get, not just a fiscal term agreement, a longer-term deal. if we were to be able to reach a longer-term deal, the grand bargain and for once and for all, put this uncertainty about taxes and spending to rest. i think that is what it would take. i think that is what would get hiring and investment back on. melissa: we saw a dip in consumer sentiment again. do you believe people are worried about the fiscal cliff? >> they are looking out what is right in front of them. we talked about this before. this is the first crack we have seen in sentiment. in the response and
and it actually doesn't make sense for the economy overall because middle income families drive the economy more than 80% of the economic activity of consumer spending is generated from people making less than 150, not 250. so we need to have middle income families have that security and then we can talk about the top 2%. >> the president is sitting down, as we speak, with six governors from both sides of the aisle. >> right. >> we're getting first pictures in of that meeting. as we wait to hear what comes from this, is it time for the president to make speaker boehner an offer that he just can't refuse, one that both sides are going to look at as serious? what harry reid is saying a what the gop came back is a nonstarter. john boehner said over the weekend we are nowhere on this. it's a nonstarter plan and i'll raise you with a nonstarter plan? >> i do think that at this stage sometimes the coverage of the back and forth doesn't really indicate to americans what's really happening. there's going to be a the lo of back and forth. i think it's still relatively early because you have two proposals
to the fiscal cliff that's threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. >> we've had time. the president has given the republicans flexibility to come up with a credible, specific plan. what they offered in return was an empty letter lacking in specifics. >> meanwhile, vice president biden is having lunch with several middle class americans who would see their income taxes go up if the tax cuts are not extended. all of this comes as the first jobs report since the election exceeded expectations. the u.s. economy added some 146,000 jobs last month. that was enough it to drive the unemployment rate down to 7.7%. joining me to talk about all of it, florida congresswoman debbie wasserman schultz and she chairs the democratic national committee. good friday afternoon to you. >> thank you. >> john boehner said today that democrats' plan is to, quote, slow walk our economy to the edge of the fiscal cliff. how do you respond it to that? >> well, that's just utterly preposterous. the republicans right now in the house of representatives have a bill that would ext
you because you we like you. jonas, any attempt to cut the debt is going to hurt the economy. >> when you can't fit a driver in a smart car, that's part the of the problem. there are studies that say over million people and other deficits, close the huge deficits might not have a huge effect on the economy, however, if xes across the board and let's not forget the spending cuts that are ought maic in the defense industry, defense industry alone is looking at hundreds of thousands of job cuts next year with nos mandatory cuts go into effect. i'm not saying they are. so it's both cutting and taxing, we're too focus on the tax. bottom line, the government takes it out of the system cutting and raising taxes and the small or deficit. that means that people are going to be out of work, almost by definition in the short run. but in the long run it's a healthier economy that doesn't go down the path of greece. if the long run greece would have low unemployment, but they do not, but yes, we're going to go a percent, if it happens the worse case scenario, but in five years we won't be not able
that will affect your spending, lifestyles or the economy in any significant way. >> yes, indeed. the president is standing confident standing firm on middle class tax cuts and against any effort by republicans to throw the debt ceiling into the equation. >> if congress in any way suggests that they're going to tieç negotiations to debt ceilg votes and take us to the brink of default once again, as part of a budget negotiation, i will not play that game. >> as the president perfects his steely gaze, keep in mistake he's keeping side eye on splintering cracks appearing amongst congressional republicans' supposedly solid front. >> personally u i know we are to raise revenue. i don't care which way we do it. i would rather see the rates go up than do it the other way. >> let's take the american people out of the line of fire. particularly that 98%. >> maybe there's something in the oklahoma water supply. if republican lawmakers are falling pray to the mendacious middle class those at fox news are standing up for the needs of those persecuted top earners. >> this is a different america. how did w
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and the speaker of house about to address perhaps this and other things. >> our economy and threatening jobs and the white house has wasted another week. you know, eight days ago secretary of state geithner came here to offer a plan that had twice the tax hikes the president campaigned on. and they had more stimulus spending than it had in cuts. and -- indefinite, infinite, increase of the debt limit like forever. four days ago we offer ad serious proposal based on testimony of president clinton's former chief of staff. since then, there has been no counteroffer from the white house. instead, reports indicate that the president has adopted deliberate strategy the slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code, cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington has a spending problem. not a receive knew problem. the president doesn't agree with our proposal, i believe that
to support the economy in the short run, get us on a sustainable fiscal path in the long run, protect the middle class we're going to see progress in this economy. >> the risk the president wants us to take increasing tax rates will hit many small businesses that produce 60 to 70% of the new jobs in our country. that's the whole issue here. >> on the fiscal cliff front, no new deals or concessions made public, but "the new york times" reports the dynamic has changed. at the request of speaker boehner, senate leaders and nancy pelosi have been dismissed from the negotiating table. leaving just the speaker and the president to hammer this one out. today vice president biden is hosting middle-class families at the white house, continuing to pressure congress to strike a deal on tax rates below 250,000. yesterday, the president struck a hopeful note with a middle-income family in virginia, while maintaining a hardline on negotiations. >> the message that i think we all want to send to members of congress is, this is a sovble problem. i'm not going to sign any package that somehow prevents
economy. no minimum-wage comment no laws against discrimination. if you fire, four weeks termination notice and unemployment is at 2%. >> you can start of business, flexible, hire and fire and it makes it attractive. john: thank you anne jolis and thank god we don't have those dumb laws. we have plenty. weird getting more and people want more like a guaranteed vacation. >> absolutely. we work too hard. france and italy six weeks is normal. john: america does not have mandatory vacation but we have 170,000 pages of federal rules and they keep passing more. it shows how america has recovered since the great depression. to sit out this graph from dan mitchell because of these rules add this up and the government spending, tax increase coming can understand when our entrepreneurs think i do not want to hire people then i want to keep my company small then i am stuck with a mandate. i am worried we become like you're up at the same time that model is falling apart. john: we did have these laws but not as many. >> as much as seven like the regulated laissez-faire economy just make sure you
savings as part of that and invest in things that matter to the american economy. we think we can do that. we have a good chance to do it now. it's important that we do it. i think we're going to get there. >> given tough talk over the weekend, why aren't we waking up to down numbers, red arrows? >> europe is terrific. bond rates are phenomenal. a great run. china numbers are better. i think that there's a lot of people who feel like doug cast does who writes with me with a piece in "the new york times" saying that -- >> most stuff is nontaxable accounts any way. most stocks that people won't be as motivated to sell as people think. of course that doesn't necessarily deal with the increase in payroll taxes and the whole recession side of it. it does deal with the stock market side in terms of selling. >> why not say, listen, fiscal cliff, i have to cut numbers. i have to cut guidance. i think many ceos will cut guidance because of the possibility that the amt is going to -- this alternative minimum tax, people don't know they have to write a check for $3,500 at the end of the year. once y
two acquisitions. plains exploration and mcmoran exploration. >>> concerns over the u.s. economy as adp misses estimates. the blame goes to superstorm sandy. goldman says the party is officially over for gold. >> starbucks at an investors conference will add 1,500 stores in the u.s. over the next five years. wait until you hear what they said about china. >> a big day in media. pandora ceo joins us live later this morning as the stock fell nearly 20% on weak guidance and netflix signs a big exclusive with disney. how much are they having to pay up for that? >>> let's deal with this big deal. as i've been telling you we'll see a lot of big deals -- i was wrong. here we are. freeport mcmoran buying not one but two companies. the combined price if you add it all together gets close to $20 billion. that does include debt. let's go through some of the details. it's somewhat complex. let's start with bigger of the two deals. freeport's purchase of plains. approximately $6.9 billion in total now. it's a cash and stock deal. .6531 shares and 39 bucks a share in cash. that adds up to $50
stimulating the economy even after the labor market gets better. we know this isn't likely going to steer the central bank in one direction or another. you flip the coin over, though, you have this people who say this report is very important. it's going to be driving the conversation on the fiscal cliff. we only have 25 days until the tax hikes and spending cuts start to take effect. here is the thing. this number came in much better than expected, don. so the bad part about this is that it may not motivate all those politicians on capitol hill as much as it may have, if it came in much weak er. this may not light the fire, so to speak. that could be the downside to the upside surprise to the number. don? >> alison, stick around. we'll get back to you as well. >>> from wall street now to washington where the white house is keep iing a close eye on today's numbers. brianna keilar joins us now live. good morning, brianna. >> reporter: good morning to you, don. we're still awaiting reaction from the white house and also from congssional republicans. they've long said at the white house, tak
for the economy. and, frankly, i find it difficult to see how it's better political ground even for the gop. i figured, i didn't get it. so i figured this was beyond my small political brain to understand. so i asked some of my smarter hill republican friends what the near r theory was here. they told me the idea is while the president can permit the economy to fall over the fiscal cliff, or curb, whatever you want to call it, he can't allow us to default on our debt. that would, like, destroy the economy. that gives republicans a stronger hand or so they think. but really, think about that. here's how it would go. later this month, republicans would, by voting present, which everyone would think was a bit weird, permit the bush tax cuts to expire for income over $250,000. that would let president obama pocket $1 trillion in tax revenue and secure a win on his key priority in the talks. but they would do nothing else. at the end of the year, we would still go over the fiscal cliff. remember, the bush tax cuts are one of the at least stimulative policies in the negotiations. according to the ec
.7%. the economy added 146,000 jobs, not great but good. a third of that came from the retail sector. 53,000 jobs added. professional and business services up 43,000. leisure and hospitality up. construction, though, lost 20,000 jobs. we should note that jobs numbers were revise d downward, though, for september and october. in september it was revised from 148,000 gain to 238,000. went from 138,000 to 132,000. this month, the 7.7 is a full point lower than where we were at this time last year. so what are we supposed to make of these numbers and does the november report provide us a real sense of where this recovery is right now? let's bring in the man we like to bring in every month, the chief economist for moody's analytics. mark, i have to start with this sandy impact. the labor department specifically put out a statement saying our survey response rates and the affects ee eed states. it did not affect estimates for november. do you believe that? >> i'm skeptical. i mean, new yorkers worked really hard and got it together gracefully given the circumstances. i suspect when we get all the data
stop the generation of jobs in this economy. >> there's a great article today in one of the papers about how apartment building, we have a shortage of apartments and shortage of housing and shortage of autos and shortage of office buildings developing, shortage of shopping centers, shortage of shopping malls. this is what begins a movement. you have to hire eventually. now you could say people are not looking for work, come on. look, jobs are here. they can -- it can be just easily reversed if you have no idea what is the future because of washington. >> given the data points that we've had in terms of claims numbers that did reflect an impact from sandy, they said 85,000 jobs or 86,000 jobs were sliced because of impact of sandy. average hours worked unchanged. doesn't that -- i don't know -- doesn't that bring into question a little bit the participation in the survey. how can it have no impact whatsoever? it seems curious to me. >> it does call into question whether these numbers can be accurate. we have been starting to think let's check accuracy. why isn't this done by s.a.p.?
the economy is pretty well positioned potentially in 2013 if we can put this behind us. so i think a lot of what's going on is what you would expect to see in this negotiation, very public negotiation, which is not the best way to do it. i think at some point, the president and the speaker are going to get in a room and have some very serious dialogue as this gets closer. my view is that both the administration and the republicans would prefer to put a deal together, and the outlines of that are on the table. >> you talk about the cliff or the abyss? we need to separate the two. it would be nice to have like a bridge to that $4 trillion deal that includes entitlement, tax reform. in fact, i don't know why the president isn't talking about that more with the simpson-bowles. >> the president did say that he doesn't think there's anything we can get done. >> as a bridge to that. always talking about the high end. >> actually, joe, i think the administration wants to see a deal come together here. >> for what, the fiscal cliff or the fiscal abyss? >> for both. >> for both. >> so that a down
was an empty letter. >> when it comes to fiscal cliff that's threat nick our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. >> tax cuts is what caused the fall of the united states from super power status. >> this president just won a big election and you would think that he would want to lead. >> we've had the election. the president was clear in the campaign that he was advocating and fighting for the middle income tax cuts. >> tax cuts. the whole premise of tax cuts is going to be blamed for all of this economic mess. >> this is a moment of truth. the clock is ticking, christmas it coming, the goose is getting fat. in many homes across america, it's a very, very lean time. >> the reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. >> greta: with us is co-host of the five, greg gutfeld. he has a new book out, the joy of hate. he's been on a road trip having a book tour, so he has been talking to lots of people and they have been talking to him. so we want to know. are americans frus
to inject money in a credit fashion into their economy. and we certainly think we can bring our fixed income expertise and continue to help them. >> that would make sense for cantor. ireland was the mf-will first they were in trouble, then the model for the world. what got them into trouble again, housing or real estate or something or bad banks or -- and now again they're kind of a model for everyone on how to handle it. is that basically the last five years? >> absolutely. certainly was a real estate bubble there. now there are austerity measures being put in place and they're actually following through on the austerity measures. so certainly they'll come out first and actually look pretty good. >> so where is the most business for you for cantor in ireland, what will you be doing? >> certainly it's an equity based firm. we'll bring our fixed income expertise, probably become the primary dealer there. the irish government will continue to have to have bond issuances as well as corporate debt will start to become a much bigger part of their economy. >> who else looked at this firm, do you k
slow job creation and increase unemployment possibly plunging the economy back into a recession. let's go to dana joining us from capitol hill. the latest negotiations don't seem to be going anywhere. >> they sure don't. the house speaker ended the week by calling it a wasted week. he only had one phone call with the president of the united states and he said it was just, "more of the same." now counter offer to what the republicans put out during the week which was $800 billion in new tax revenue. so there's certainly a lot of frustration. particularly right now on the side of republicans who understand that democrats have the leverage right now. but on friday, the speaker did do something that seemed to indicate a little bit of day light. and that is he declined to put a line in the sand on that big issue that divides the two parties, which is raising tax rates for the wealthiest americans. he was asked a number of times whether he's still sticking to that. he didn't say yes. instead, here's what he said. >> there are a lot of things that are possible to put the revenue the preside
for the economies in our states, as you're thinking about other changes, whether it's in the tax code or whether it's in cuts, if states are affected, we ought to have a seat at the table. that was really our message to all three. we said at the outset we're not embracing one plan or the other. i believe that they clearly want to get it done and we're hopeful that they will. it's important that they get it done soon. >> right. governor herbert, they've got to get it done because if they don't get it done, then it's going to rebound badly on your party more than the democrats because all the polls say that two-thirds of americans would blame the republicans for not getting this done, which may or may not be fair, but that's politics and that's reality. now, the sticking point on your side seems to be look, we don't want to have a plan that we sign up to that means 2% of the wealthiest americans have to pay more tax and certainly not without the kind of spending cuts we're looking for. but america doesn't agree with that, either. america, two-thirds of all people polled say they're quite happy for th
back this morning, a new report finds that exporting nat gas will actually help the u.s. economy, but not every day is a winner. >>> vice chairman alan blinder will tell us what he thinks. >>> a new study from the federal government shows exporting u.s. natural gas overseas has the potential to reshape the global energy markets. the obama administration has said the study will be central to the decision on whether to export. he said exporting the gas would be a bigger impact on the economy. >> slap in the face of dow chemical. of coke, not coke the beverage company. but this was something that was hotly disputed within the romney campaign. he really let this stuff go because the romney campaign had some very big givers that were chemical companies. >> do we know, say, very bad, how much will prices conceivableably go up if we become an exporter of natural gas? is it that great a difference? >> we burn offer more natural gas than we use. burn off, in other words literally, you see those flames, we flare more than we use. so we got a real excess of this stuff. >> the government say
cliff? are you expecting the economy to go over the fiscal cliff and see these taxes go high hadder and spending cuts take effect? >> my personal view is i'm still optimistic. i think the conversation has been constructive since. do we have a solution on the table yet? no. but i'm optimistic we'll get to a framework. >> why? >> there's been enough dialogue. there's been movement. everyone seems to recognize the problem. everybody realizes there has to be a revenue component, spend component, entitlement reform component. for us, the business community and all the ceos, certainty is the greatest stimulus for us. >> do you support tax rates going higher? >> me personally, as an individual, more importantly the business community, which i'm part of. we support something inclusive. if rates were higher in a videocasset vacuum, i'm not sure we'd be supportive of that. we have to make sure the consumers, those who spends a lot of the dollars, the middle class, are protected in this exercise. >> i guess the question i'm really getting at is, do you get the revenue from tax increases or fro
no plan. >> austin, it's clear from this jobs report the economy is stuck in second gear. what's it going to take to get to a higher gear right now, do you think? >> i think we got to get the growth rate up in the economy. certainly europe's not any help. what's happening in china and japan is not any help. then you add on top of it what's coming out of washington. i don't think you should get your hopes up about figuring it out before the end of this year. i think there's a pretty deept chance we go over the cliff and then try to sort it out in the beginning of the year. >> lovely. >> joe, when did 146,000 jobs become good? have we become so pessimistic -- have our expectations come so low we're cheering 146,000 when we should be well over 200? >> plus the downward revisions for the previous two months. >> although, those revisions were almost all in government. mandy makes a good point. 150,000 a month, which has been the average over the past is a months or so, is not great. if this was a normal recovery, we'd be growing at 4% instead of 2 on gdp. employment would be well over 250. how
the economy to go over the fiscal cliff? what kind of reaction might we see in the market if that were to materialize? >> well, if we saw the market sell off in a big way, i don't think anybody believes we're going to go over the fiscal cliff. there will be some sort of resolution. they'll come up with some tax cuts, some breaks in spending, and probably kick the can down the road on a lot of it. i love the way this market is acting. it's not selling off with all the bad news, all the bickering, all the bad words on each side. you've got to love the way that this market is holding up here. doesn't mean investors need to be carefree, but overall, it looks like the market is setting up with a lot of negative sentiment out there. looks like there's a lot of opportunity for a big run higher once we get some form of resolution. i really believe we're going to get it. >> you think by year end? >> i really do. i think they want to go home for christmas. they're not going to want to not go home for christmas. you can always count on politicians to do the right thing when all other options have
, there is progress in some key sectors of our economy. we've seen housing finally begin to bounce back for the first time and that has an enormous ripple effect throughout the economy. consumer confidence is as high as it's been. many of you over the last two or three years have experienced record profits or near record profits and have a lot of money in plants and equipment and hire folks. obviously globally, the economy is still soft. europe is going to be in the doldrums for quite some time, asia is not charging forward and some of the emerging markets are not charging forward as quickly as they were maybe a few years ago, but i think all of you recognized and many of you told me is that everybody's looking to america, because they understand if we're able to put forward a long-term agenda for growth and prosperity that's broad-based here in the united states, that confidence will not just increase here in the united states, it will increase globally and we can get the virtuous cycle that i think all of us have been waiting for and want to see. what's holding us back right now ironically is a lot
and the president. a little christmas cheer some early. the u.s. economy generating a stronger than expected 146,000 new jobs in november helping trim the jobless rate to 7.7%. a four-year low. happy holidays, right? not if you're john boehner. >> this isn't a progress report because there is no progress to report. the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. >> yes, indeed, it's like a visit from the ghost of christmas past, casual friday edition. another positive month of jobs numbers, another glum assessment by bah humbug boehner. he couldn't even be bothered to put on a holiday tie to take up the case of mr. scrooge and the top 2%. as nancy pelosi asked, why, oh, why is congress on another recess when they could be extending tax breaks for the middle class just in time for christmas? >> this is a moment of truth, the clock is ticking, christmas is coming, the goose is getting fat, why are you not bringing this to the floor? is this a forever, forever protection of the wealthiest people in our country at the expense of the mid
remember they had to deal with a weak economy and aggressive soviet union and the fallout from vietnam. they overcame those problems and they changed the world for the better. we can do the same. and that's the memo. now on to the top story tonight. the president's refusal to budge in negotiations with the g.o.p. on fiscal cliff talks. joining me now university of chicago booth school of business professor and former chairman of the council of economic advisors under president obama, dr. austan goolsbee. dr. goolsbee, where is the stethoscope? come on, i see it there hello, good to see you, austin. >> hey, laura great to see you again. i painted the pictures why conservatives should figure it out and not be in despair. on the other side of the equation you have the president. let's say the president gets his tax hikes. you know, everyone thinks they are going to have higher taxes in the new year. so he gets tax hikes. but then what? i mean, the new normal that's being painted by your friends over at the oecd say our girls will probably be about 2.2%. 2% maybe if we're luck in next year
wealthy americans are the ones who are creating the jobs and helping to turn this economy around. that remains the big sticking point. those bush era tax cuts, white house saying it should be extended for middle class americans but not for those upper income americans, carol. >> how seriously should we take these negotiations? both sides are negotiating in public, not the greatest way to negotiate in the world, right? >> reporter: right. you sort of have to take it based on the information they give you. there's a lot that goes on behind the scenes. we've seen this play out over the last four years where both sides will sort of throw these sharp elbows publicly, but then they do hammer something out. we do have to take it seriously. you have to get a sense that both sides understand the serious nature of this fiscal cliff and they do want a deal to get done. so they are looking for ways to find some kind of agreement. they are looking at outside groups today as well. the president will meet with half a dozen governors, arkansas, minnesota, utah, wisconsin, republican governor fro
this was for the economy. this is a multiyear low reading in the manufacturing numbers. we haven't seen a number like this since 2009. we haven't seen an employment index number like this since september of 2009, the last time it was at this level, unemployment, 9.8%. we have a nonfarm payrolls number coming out on friday. you'll be lucky to see a positive number in front of that. i don't see how the market overcomes that kind of thing. independent of all this jibber jabber over the fiscal cliff, the economy is in really rough shape now. >> it is. we're seeing businesses cut back, getting ready for the eventuality they see coming, no deal by december 31st this worsening. sam, how do you want to be invested in 2013? where is the growth in the economy coming from, if anywhere? >> i think the growth is coming from an improvement in the housing sector. i think we are starting to see a slowdown in the job loss from the government sector. so, i think we're going to be seeing a better than half speed recovery. so, you do want to be taking a balanced approach. we do favor the consumer discretionary at this p
economy for no good reason. it's taking the sharp knife covered in explosives away from a kid who has a lot of temper tantrums. it seems like a good thing to do. the white house calls it the mcconnell plan because it's based on an idea that mitch mcconnell proposed become in july 2011. but even though it is mitch mcconnell's idea, even though he came up with it, mitch mcconnell is not for it. mitch mcconnell at this point does not support the mcconnell plan at all. he didn't think democrats did either. and yesterday he wanted to call their bluff. now that is when c-span2 suddenly became amazing television. yesterday afternoon mitch mcconnell asked the senate to move to an immediate vote on the mcconnell plan. vote on it now. he figured harry reid would back down. prove that even democrats don't like this idea. but reid did not back down. he doubled down. he said, yeah, let's vote on the plan. but let's move to an immediate up or down vote. no filibuster, no 60-vote requirement, let's see if it gets 51. if so, it's passed. at which point, mcconnell kind of filibustered his own bill. he
ceo warns the cliff must get stalled or the economy could be stifled well into 2014. >>> even more dividends pushed into 2012. coach, american eagle moving up and oracle will play out three-quarters of dividends this year. >>> more strength in housing this morning. toll brothers earnings top expectations. we'll begin with the fiscal cliff. governors are set to meet today with the president and congressional leaders. governors are concerned about the impact of deficit reduction measures on their state budgebu. the latest gop offer would overhaul the tax code, raise $800 billion in new revenue but seek $600 billion in health savings, net savings add up to about $2.2 trillion over ten years. boehner called the white house's original offer la la land and it does appear that even though at one point bowles endorsed a blueprint like this, he's trying to distance himself from it right now. >> the president got re-elected. he's claiming he got re-elected in part because he wants to tax that 2%. he cannot go back on that. in the meantime, congress most of the republicans signed the grover n
to think raising taxes on the wealthy, not cutting entitlements, save the economy, but it's the opposite. the cuts have to come, they will come. the question is do we address them now whens they have a chance to do something about them or wait until the whole system collapses on itself. neil: do you think democrats could be over playing their hand, that, yes, ey won the election, not a land slide, doing what george bush did when he was re-elected, the social security thing, just over played his hand. >> well, i don't think so because don't forget, the public polls, which for lack of a better barometer, what we all look at, people blame republicans more than democrats. neil: recession ensues, it's on everybody. >> exaly right, but barack obama doesn't have to run again. very cognizant of th fact. i'm not, you know, i'm not the grim reaper about this. i believe we are going to get a deal. it's going to be a bad deal because nobody will be happy. the purpose of this is to have pain inflighted on everyone, nobody gets 100%. we'll have tax hikes as well. neil: why i featured the union coming
to in order to protect small businesses and our economy. instead, new revenue would be generated through pro growth tax reform that closes special interest loopholes and deductions while lowering rates. i'm going to guess that is the very line that the white house is going to say no deal to, right? >> so, let me understand. if in fact we want $800 billion in new revenues and we could do that through closing loopholes, limiting -- for the very wealthy in this country and we're going to not have a deal because it's not a rate increase, but rather taking a same amount of money from the same people and we're going to say no to that? >> well, there are people who said the math doesn't work out. doesn't actually get you enough money. >> i've been studying this for seven years. that's baloney. it's easy to get $800 billion out of the wealthy in the country by limiting deductions and taking away options that are specifically benefit only the well off in this country. >> okay, but -- >> all you have to do is for example, people making more than $250,000 a year, should we give them a mortgage deductio
out the $800 billion? i for one, if you didn't care about the economy and you didn't care about the american people, you bet your life you can get $800 billion or trillion dollars out of raising -- eliminating deductions and tax credits. >> but conman, he kncongressman you muster all those deductions together they only amount to about $400 billion. >> i think we could do that. i think we can do it. first of all, you have to make certain that local and state tax deductions are not there. then you take away all the charitable deductions that we have. then you take away all of the mortgage deductions for the rich and the middle income, all that you have there. and then you start looking at the deductions that you have for children, for earned income tax credits, for the poor people that are there. if you really look at everything that so many americans have taken for granted and even if you don't reach the $800 billion, at least you will find out what is this man talking about. just don't say you can't do it, it's not arithmetic. give them a piece of chalk, go to the blackboard, an
economy, they invigorate our soul. america can be a lawful society and a welcoming society at the same time. as our nation debates the proper course of action relating to immigration, i hope we do so with a benevolent spirit and keep in mind the contribution of immigrants. >> it's a very interesting reminder. jeb bush, of course, has been very outspoken but there is a different wing of the republican party. >> we george w. bush talk about taking a softer line on immigration the day after republicans in the senate refused to ratify a treaty on discrimination against disabled people. those are two different courses for the republican party and i see one thing that strikes me, you have george w. bush here, robert dole, another former presidential nominee on the floor of the state. the party is moving on. these are not the most powerful voices in the party. the speeches we heard yesterday from marco rubio and paul ryan are i think more influential when trying to look at where is the republican party going to go. >> and, in fact, paul ryan here's another little bit of paul ryan speaking at
on anything but washington. the whole u.s. economy, your entire portfolio is hostage to two warring parties, demonstrating a level of partisanship that's been empirically measured to being the worst since 1860, the origins of the civil war. let's hope it doesn't take out that particular benchmark. we're witnessing a titanic struggle between those who are willing to rise above politics, and compromise to cut spending and increase taxes. yes, that's the actual compromise radical middle position as dave cote from honeywell says, and those who simply refuse to accept tax increases or entitlement cuts. given that the president's saying he campaigned and won on a platform of higher taxes for the wealthy and the republicans say they were elected because they pledged to behind the scenes power broker grover norquist they would never raise taxes, it certainly seems like the impasse cannot be solved and we got to go over the cliff. not only do the hard liners refuse to rise above partisanship in order to avoid a government mandated recession, which is what it's tantamount to doing, but we can't even
to 7.7%. the economy added 146,000 jobs last month, and that is one reason why today john boehner kind of, sort of maybe entertained the idea of giving president obama what he wants on tax rates, at least rhetorically. >> even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion deficits for as far as the eye can see. listen, washington's got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. >> joining me now are richard wolffe, the executive editor of msnbc.com and an msnbc political analyst, and robert reich, former labor secretary and a professor at the university of california berkeley. he is also the author of "beyond outrage." richard, i want to go to you first here. the president talked quite a bit in the election cycle. >> quite a bit. >> he did, period, about the fever breaking amongst republicans in congress . >> yes. >> it's been quite feverish of late, which is to say a lot of back and forth, a lot of hot air blown from the house caucus. i wonder if you think that fever might be breaking with the suggestion john boehner said, eve
that. our economy is a lot better. we can still go a long way. i just don't believe that there is the makeup of a great deal, because you can't trust anything any of these folks say. this is one of the reasons why i believe, tom, that the republicans haven't detailed out exactly what deductions are we talking about, what loopholes are they talking about. they won't come clean with the american people on this. it's all in these vague generalities. now, president obama is not interested in taking negotiations further until republicans put a rate increase on the table. and this is where boehner is running into trouble. do you think they'll eventually put a rate increase on the table? >> they're either going to do that or take us into a very dangerous fiscal situation over the cliff. this is a lucy in the football situation and the president says, i'm not going to kick again until you show me some serious commitment. and keep in mind, this is the republican leadership that supported the $718 billion of savings in medicare that was part of the health care provisions to ex
. we're going to talk about the fiscal cliff. if we go over it, will it really destroy the u.s. economy? we'll show you some stats to make you go -- hmm. we'll talk more about apple's slide, should microsoft's ceo steve ballmer get the boot if the surface fails. and we will introduce to you quite possibly the world's dumbest demolition crew. it involves a multi-million dollar bore chateau and really bad bulldozing. >> yikes. see you at 1:00, brian. thank you. >>> listen up wall street recruiters, a recent rash of college cheating scandals has shown academic dishonesty is unfortunately a very big problem on campus today. who are the worst offenders? tonight's premier of "faking the grade -- classroom cheaters," we'll tell you. they'll find out which students are most likely to cut corners in the battle to gain an edge. >> reporter: don mccabe and his canadian colleague collaborate on research. mccabe says in the u.s. business students cheat the most. engineering students are often near the top of the list. and so are communications and journalism students. women studied at one university
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